Renewable Energy – Is it Political?

Technology such as computers, mobile phones, battery chargers like the best battery chargers by Zenaracing are continually advancing to make everyday living easier and more productive. However, renewable energy must also be considered to be incorporated in these technologies with political support. Renewable energy and politics, how are they related? Can Renewable Energy flourish without the support of politics?

Roughly 12% of gross final energy usage in Ireland emanate from renewable sources while the gross final energy usage in Denmark is 33%. Denmark has now surpassed its 2020 target, whereas Ireland is not likely to reach its goal of 16% and could fall short by as much as 3%. Whilst Ireland has a wider land area, the populace are similar, the usage of land, as well as agriculture, are akin, however, Denmark has almost three times as much renewable energy as compared to Ireland. Why is this so?

Political commitment is the answer to that. After a period of increasing prices of oil in the early 1980’s, Denmark devoted to a new Energy Strategy, State of Green. The idea has led Denmark to trust that it can shift and turn into a green and resource efficient economy, and by 2050 completely independent of fossil fuels. In the meantime, Ireland lags in 20th spot in the European record of renewable energy usage.

There is a great deal of academic study to show that while there are numerous factors affecting the shift to renewable energy, counting natural resource, culture as well as the ease of use of assets that are owned by the state, the influence of politics is the most noteworthy determinant. It is commonly received that political systems that have less political restrictions, have less points of access through which influential and dominant status quo veto players can slow down the progress and development of reforms on clean energy.

According to Janet Sawin, Worldwatch research associate and author of Mainstreaming Renewable Energy in the 21st Century, “Political will and the right mix of policies—not vast resource potential—have made wind and solar power the world’s fastest growing energy sources over the past decade.” In several nations, over an extended period of time, comprehensible government commitments to renewable energy have risen above barriers and formed the demand for these technologies, which led to remarkable growth, developing renewable technologies and putting down their costs.